Molly: Shetland Pony, Katrina Survivor, Prosthetic Leg Success

Received this email moments ago from dear frient Charlotte (a horse owner).  Meet Molly:

A survivor with spirit!

Molly: A survivor with spirit!

Here is the text of the email as it was forwarded.

Meet Molly. She’s a gray speckled pony who was abandoned by her owners when Katrina hit southern Louisiana. She spent weeks on her own before finally being rescued and taken to a farm where abandoned animals were stockpiled. While there, she was attacked by a pit bull terrier, and almost died. Her gnawed right front leg became infected and her vet went to LSU for help. But LSU was overwhelmed, and this pony was a welfare case. You know how that goes.But after surgeon Rustin Moore met Molly, he changed his mind. He saw how the pony was careful to lie down on different sides so she didn’t seem to get sores, and how she allowed people to handle her. She protected her injured leg. She constantly shifted her weight, and didnt overload her good leg. She was a smart pony with a serious survival ethic.

Moore agreed to remove her leg below the knee and a temporary artificial limb was built. Molly walked out of the clinic and her story really begins there.

This was the right horse and the right owner,’ Moore insists. Molly happened to be a one-in-a-million patient. Shes tough as nails, but sweet, and she was willing to cope with pain. She made it obvious she understood (that) she was in trouble. The other important factor, according to Moore, is having a truly committed and compliant owner who is dedicated to providing the daily care required over the lifetime of the horse.

Mollys story turns into a parable for life in post-Katrina Louisiana The little pony gained weight, her mane felt a comb. A human prosthesis designer built her a leg.

The prosthetic has given Molly a whole new life, Allison Barca DVM, Molly’s regular vet, reports. And she asks for it. She will put her little limb out, and come to you and let you know that she wants you to put it on. Sometimes she wants you to take it off too.’ And sometimes, Molly gets away from Barca. It can be pretty bad when you can’t catch a three-legged horse, she laughs.

Most important of all, Molly has a job now. Kay, the rescue farm owner, started taking Molly to shelters, hospitals, nursing homes, rehabilitation centers. Anywhere she thought that people needed hope. Wherever Molly went, she showed people her pluck. She inspired people. And she had a good time doing it.

Its obvious to me that Molly had a bigger role to play in life, Moore said, She survived the hurricane, she survived a horrible injury, and now she is giving hope to others. She could be a symbol for New Orleans itself.

This week, Molly the Pony, a childrens book about the pony who has already inspired thousands of people around New Orleans, has been published. Its not a book about amputation or prosthetics, its a book about people and ponies.

Not very well-written, but you can read the snopes article here, which is a much more eloquent account of Molly’s story and provides some links to other articles about her.  The book, “Molly the Pony,” is available on Amazaon.com.

LSU’s YouTube channel offers this promotional video featuring Molly.  If you’re squeamish, be aware there are a couple of mildly graphic views of Molly’s wounds and surgery.

This is Molly’s most recent prosthesis, which has a smiley face embossed in it.  Wherever Molly goes, she leaves a smiley hoof print behind.  Last time I published a feel-good animal story, I was a little cantankerous, but I’m feeling warmed and inspired by this story, from the spunk of the pony to the compassion of the rescuer to the remarkable medical and technological teamwork that went in to giving Molly a new lease on life.  Her smiling hoof-print and her work with children make this that much more special.  Today, I am thankful for this opportunity to witness humanity at its best…and to read a Katrina success story.

Isaiah 63:13 Who led them through the deep, As a horse in the wilderness, That they might not stumble?” 14 As a beast goes down into the valley, And the Spirit of the Lord causes him to rest, So You lead Your people, To make Yourself a glorious name.


		
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Moose Magic!

Baby Moose Cuddle Time!

Baby Moose Cuddle Time!

Got this in my email today from friend Pam.  This is clearly making the rounds.  Pam alone forwarded it to 55 people and the person who forwarded it to her included 11 others on her distribution list.  The text is pretty non-specific, but it gets the story across.  Here’s what it said:

A baby moose was in distress in a creek. A man got him out of the creek; tried to find the mother & send him on his way, but eventually the moose stumbled back into the creek & was rescued again. The baby moose followed the man home.

The man has only a small cabin so he took the moose to another neighbor, who took these photos. They took the moose the next day to a woman who looks after wild animals & she put it in a pen with a rescued fawn.

It doesn’t mention there are a couple of dogs around who seem cool with the whole situation as well.  The pictures are adorable…and plentiful.  I won’t include them all here, but here are the best ones.  Go ahead, make that silly face that says your heart is melting for these critters.  Mine did!

Who's A Big Boy?

Who's A Big Boy?

Looks Like A Party to Me!

Looks Like A Party to Me!

Are You My Big Brother?

Are You My Big Brother?

I don’t know what it is with the baby moose stories these days.  Just a few weeks ago, I was led to this adorable video in an email blast from GodTube (the Christian equivalent of YouTube). I can’t find it over there now, but here it is on YouTube.  Twin baby moose and their mommy, all frolicking in someone’s back yard sprinkler:
By the way, in case you were wondering, a scientist at the Forest Preserve District of Cook County (Illinois) tells us that “The word “moose” came to us from Algonquian Indians. Consequently its plural, instead of being “mooses” or “meese”, is the same as the singular. That is true of most Indian names whether of a tribe, such as the Winnebago and Potawatomi, or of an object such as papoose. It isalso true of many wildlife names not of Indian origin — for example: deer, mink and grouse.” There, now that’s settled.
What…you want more about moose?  Come on!  Go look it up yourselves!  It’s 11:00 p.m. here, guys!  I have to go to bed.  Anyway, thanks for checking in!
Genesis 7:15 And they went into the ark to Noah, two by two, of all flesh in which is the breath of life. 16 So those that entered, male and female of all flesh, went in as God had commanded him; and the Lord shut him in.